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Heads Up Online Training Course

Get prepared for the new season in less than 30 minutes

Heads Up: Concussion in Youth Sports is a free, online course available to coaches, parents, and others helping to keep athletes safe from concussion. It features interviews with leading experts, dynamic graphics and interactive exercises, and compelling storytelling to help you recognize a concussion and know how to respond if you think that your athlete might have a concussion. Once you complete the training and quiz, you can print out a certificate, making it easy to show your league or school you are ready for the season.

What You Will Learn

This course will help you:

  • Understand a concussion and the potential consequences of this injury,
  • Recognize concussion signs and symptoms and how to respond,
  • Learn about steps for returning to activity (play and school) after a concussion, and
  • Focus on prevention and preparedness to help keep athletes safe season-to-season.

We can help athletes stay active and healthy by knowing the facts about concussion and when it is safe for athletes to return to play.

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Cole's Story: CDC Heads Up! Concussion Training Saved My Life!
Read how CDC’s online coaches' training helped a coach to recognize and respond to concussion in a young athlete.

 

Download the Course Script and Quiz:

Order or Download the Parent and Athlete Information Sheet:

THERE'S MORE TO KNOW, KEEP READING...

Concussion in Sports Fast Facts

football players

  • A concussion is a brain injury and all are serious.
  • Most concussions occur without loss of consciousness.
  • Recognition and proper response to concussions when they first occur can help prevent further injury or even death.

What is a Concussion?

volleyball playersA concussion is a type of traumatic brain injury, or TBI, caused by a bump, blow, or jolt to the head that can change the way your brain normally works. Concussions can also occur from a blow to the body that causes the head to move rapidly back and forth. Even a “ding,” “getting your bell rung,” or what seems to be mild bump or blow to the head can be serious.

Online training Concussions can occur in any sport or recreation activity. So, all coaches, parents, and athletes need to learn concussion signs and symptoms and what to do if a concussion occurs.

 

How can I learn more?

CDC has created free tools for youth and high school sports coaches, parents, athletes, and health care professionals that provide important information on preventing, recognizing, and responding to a concussion.

A "Heads Up" on Managing Return to Play

Photo: David E. Sugerman, MD, MPHExternal Web Site Icon

View the videoExternal Web Site Icon (Free login required through Medscape)